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Canine Oral Swellings

Swellings in the mouth can come in a variety of shapes and sizes. After determining the cause of the swelling, treatments including surgery, medication and radiation can be considered.

Benign Swellings

Viral Papilloma

Gum chewers Lesion

Named gum chewers lesion because affected dogs appear to be chewing gum. Visibly there will be growths under the back part of the tongue. Treatment involves laser removal of the excessive tissue.

Viral Papilloma

Gum chewers Lesion

Named gum chewers lesion because affected dogs appear to be chewing gum. Visibly there will be growths under the back part of the tongue. Treatment involves laser removal of the excessive tissue.

Peripheral Odontogentic Fibroma (POF)

Peripheral Odontogentic Fibroma (POF)

Peripheral odontogenic fibromas include fibromatous and ossifying epulides. Epulis (plural=epulides) is a general term referring to a gingival mass of any type. The ossifying type is distinguished from the fibromatous type by containing varying amounts of bone, osteoid, dentinoid, or cementum-like tissue. Peripheral odontogenic fibromas are considered benign. Complete surgical removal is the treatment of choice.

Acanthomatus Ameloblastoma

Acanthomatus Ameloblastoma

The acanthomatous ameloblastoma occurs commonly in dogs. This tumor is considered benign because it does not spread to distant locations however it can be locally invasive. Treatment of acanthomatus ameloblastoma is wide excision in all planes.

Oral swellings

Tumor Surgery

Often dogs develop noticeable swellings on their faces.  These can be due to tooth infections or tumors. Fortunately many swellings can be treated and dogs cured. 

Facial Swelling

Facial Discharge

Before Treatment

Facial swelling and discharge due to  infection caused from a broken tooth 

Facial Swelling After

Facial Swelling

After Treatment

Swelling resolved after tooth extraction

Malignant Tumors

Fibrosarcoma

Fibrosarcoma

Fibrosarcoma

Fibrosarcoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

The second most common malignant tumor in the dog. Treatment of choice is surgical removal with a guarded prognosis.

Malignant Melanoma

Malignant Melanoma

The most commonly diagnosed malignant oral tumor in the dog. Treatment options include surgical removal with wide margins, radiation therapy, and use of the canine melanoma vaccine.

Plasmacytoma

Plasmacytoma

Plasmacytoma is a malignant tumor if plasma cells. Treatment options include surgical removal with wide margins.